Homebuyers

By Jim Cleer, Mortgage Loan Officer

Congratulations! You just bought a new home and should be closing on the purchase in the near future. So, when should you schedule your movers? Buying a new home can be stressful enough without adding the pressure of packing up all your belongings and moving to your new home. Below are some helpful tips that should alleviate some of that stress.

  • Schedule your closing first. The mortgage process is complex and little things can pop up at any time to delay your closing by a day or two. Things seldom go exactly as planned when closing on a home, so give yourself a cushion for moving.
  • Don’t move on closing day. Closing on your home is stressful enough with the mounds of paperwork. Take time after you sign to decompress a little before the stress of moving kicks in.
  • If you’re selling a home and purchasing a new one, negotiate a few days in the purchase agreement to stay in the home after your close.
  • Hire movers to relieve some of the moving day dress. Not only will this save you time, but it allows you to focus on other moving tasks during the process.

With so many lending options available to you, make sure you take your time selecting a realtor and loan officer that are knowledgeable, experienced and proactive. A good loan officer can get you to the closing table, but a great loan officer will get you there with less stress and headaches along the way. Listen to what they tell you, and supply all requested documents quickly and efficiently and the whole process will go much smoother.

Good luck!

Managing Your Move When Closing On A Home
By Jim Cleer, Mortgage Loan Officer Congratulations! You just bought a new home and should be closing on the purchase in the near future. So, when should you schedule your movers? Buying a new home can be stressful enough without adding the pressure of packing up all your belongings and moving to your new home. Below are some helpful tips that should alleviate some of that stress. Schedule your closing first. The mortgage process is complex and little things can pop up at any time to delay your closing by a day or two. Things seldom go exactly as planned when ...
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